Silicon Power

Choose your country/region

Asia/Pacific
  • AustraliaAustralia
    English
  • BangladeshBangladesh
    English
  • CambodiaCambodia
    English
  • ChinaChina
    中文 (简体)
  • HongKongHongKong
    中文 (繁體)
  • IndiaIndia
    English
  • IndonesiaIndonesia
    English
  • JapanJapan
    日本語
  • KoreaKorea
    English
  • MalaysiaMalaysia
    English
  • MongoliaMongolia
    English
  • MyanmarMyanmar
    ဗမာ
  • NepalNepal
    English
  • New ZealandNew Zealand
    English
  • PakistanPakistan
    English
  • PhilippinesPhilippines
    English
  • SingaporeSingapore
    English
  • SriLankaSriLanka
    English
  • TaiwanTaiwan
    中文 (繁體)
  • ThailandThailand
    English
  • VietnamVietnam
    Tiếng Việt
Europe
  • AustriaAustria
    Deutsch
  • BelarusBelarus
    Pусский
  • BelgiumBelgium
    Dutch
  • BosniaBosnia
    English
  • BulgariaBulgaria
    English
  • CroatiaCroatia
    English
  • CyprusCyprus
    English
  • Czech RepublicCzech Republic
    English
  • DenmarkDenmark
    English
  • EstoniaEstonia
    English
  • FinlandFinland
    English
  • FranceFrance
    Français
  • GermanyGermany
    Deutsch
  • GreeceGreece
    English
  • HungaryHungary
    English
  • IcelandIceland
    English
  • IrelandIreland
    English
  • ItalyItaly
    Italiano
  • KazakhstanKazakhstan
    Pусский
  • KosovoKosovo
    English
  • MacedoniaMacedonia
    English
  • MaltaMalta
    English
  • NetherlandsNetherlands
    Dutch
  • NorwayNorway
    English
  • PolandPoland
    Polski
  • PortugalPortugal
    English
  • RomaniaRomania
    English
  • RussiaRussia
    Pусский
  • SerbiaSerbia
    English
  • SlovakiaSlovakia
    English
  • SloveniaSlovenia
    English
  • SpainSpain
    Español
  • SwedenSweden
    English
  • SwitzerlandSwitzerland
    Deutsch
  • TurkeyTurkey
    English
  • UkraineUkraine
    Pусский
  • United KingdomUnited Kingdom
    English
North America
  • CanadaCanada
    English
  • United StatesUnited States
    English
Latin America
  • ArgentinaArgentina
    Español
  • BoliviaBolivia
    Español
  • BrasilBrasil
    English
  • ChileChile
    Español
  • ColombiaColombia
    Español
  • Costa RicaCosta Rica
    Español
  • Dominican RepublicDominican Republic
    Español
  • EcuadorEcuador
    Español
  • El SalvadorEl Salvador
    Español
  • GuatemalaGuatemala
    Español
  • HondurasHonduras
    Español
  • MéxicoMéxico
    Español
  • PanamaPanama
    Español
  • ParaguayParaguay
    Español
  • PeruPeru
    Español
  • UruguayUruguay
    Español
  • VenezuelaVenezuela
    Español
Middle East/Africa
  • AlgeriaAlgeria
    English
  • EgyptEgypt
    English
  • IsraelIsrael
    English
  • KenyaKenya
    English
  • LebanonLebanon
    English
  • MauritiusMauritius
    English
  • MoroccoMorocco
    Français
  • Saudi ArabiaSaudi Arabia
    English
  • South AfricaSouth Africa
    English
  • TunisiaTunisia
    English
  • UAEUAE
    English
Others
  • OthersOthers
    English
Dr

Dual Secure Design for Power Failure Protection

SP Industrial Implements Dual Secure Design for Power Failure Protection (PFP)
How Does the SSD Controller Manage Power Failure?
SSD FW stored inside NAND Flash is called a system block. When the system power is on, the SSD will load the related mapping table and initial commands into DRAM for the SSD controller (Figure 1-A). When VCC is under 4V (Figure 1-B), the SSD Controller will enable the Power Shielding function. During this period, the SSD controller will start to flush DRAM cache data save into FLASH to secure the user data in a limited time. At the same time, when VCC is under 4V, the SSD controller will stop receiving commands from the Host (Figure 1-C) to protect itself. During this period, the Host cannot recognize the SSD and the SSD will stop working until VCC resumes and becomes stable again.
When VCCF is under 2.7V (Figure 1-D), the SSD controller will initiate the FLUSH command to write back the mapping table back to the flash system block. During this period, the Host cannot recognize the SSD and the SSD cannot work, even if the power resumes. In order for the SSD to start working normally again, you need to turn the power ON/OFF for the Host to restart the SSD. During SSD operation, data is temporarily stored in the DRAM cache to reduce the performance gap between the Host interface and the NAND Flash memory. However, in cases of unexpected sudden power loss, such as unplugging the power from the system, sudden battery loss, or unplugging devices from the system, the flushing process cannot be completed and may cause serious device failure. Silicon Power’s Dual Secure Design for Power Failure Protection (PFP) prevents such issues with a firmware-based protection mechanism and a capacitor backup circuit.
How Does the Advanced PFP Mechanism Work?
The Power Shielding function integrates built-in VDT and firmware mechanism. The trigger alert is able to monitor an abnormal power drop and take instant action, such as prohibit receiving data from the Host and backup mapping/linking table into FLASH, as soon as potential power failure is detected.
Advanced PFP is a way to gain more time for the data flushing process from DRAM cache to FLASH under sudden power-off situations by using dedicated polymer capacitor components. These capacitors are charged during power on and offer charged power to the SSD circuit under sudden power-off situations.
SP Industrial’s Advanced PFP technology SSD provides at least 20ms to ensure the data flushing task can be completed within the discharge time. Furthermore, it always passes the Power Cycling test under abnormal conditions at least 3,000 times.
How Does the SSD Controller Manage Power Failure? (2.5”SSD R Series)